DUNHILL COMMUNITY
KENTA COBAYASHI

Japanese artist Kenta Cobayashi is known for his use of distortion. His work is characterised by digital manipulation of images, drawing inspiration from the changing landscape of Tokyo. Using photography and film in abstract ways, Kenta’s work looks to understand the nature of truth through the complexities of the Japanese language – exploring its nuances of meaning and its obvious and bold graphic properties.

Examples of previous work, see below:
Washing Machine #smudge, 2016
Don Quijote #smudge, 2016
Dennou #smudge, 2017
©Kenta Cobayashi

For Spring Summer 2020 runway show, dunhill Creative Director Mark Weston and Kenta come together for a special collaboration. Celebrating our London archive with unique, re-engineered print designs. The new collection of selected Kenta pieces, some that featured in Paris, are out now including statement jackets, leather goods and casualwear; with more pieces to drop as part of our summer capsule in May.

SHOP THE CAPSULE

Kenta Cobayashi Print Poncho

Kenta Cobayashi Print Poncho

Kenta Cobayashi Jacquard T-shirt

Kenta Cobayashi Jacquard T-shirt

Kenta Cobayashi Jacquard T-shirt

Kenta Cobayashi Jacquard T-shirt

Kenta Cobayashi Print Trousers

Kenta Cobayashi Print Trousers

Kenta Cobayashi Print Reversible Bomber

Kenta Cobayashi Print Reversible Bomber

Kenta Cobayashi Print Lined Mac

Kenta Cobayashi Print Lined Mac

Kenta Cobayashi Print Lined Harrington Jacket

Kenta Cobayashi Print Lined Harrington Jacket

Creating a playful distortion of our Jermyn Street storefront from a 1970s dunhill archive catalogue. Original artwork by Kenta Cobayashi.

“The way Kenta’s work utilises distortion really struck a chord with me for this collection. Kenta was so open, generous and easy. His ‘Smudge’ series is a favourite period of mine and we absorbed those ideas in an open dialogue about dunhill. In this way, we transferred designs to bags, silk cotton shirting and paper nylon hats. Kenta was so new to this and yet he was never precious about his approach to artwork and was genuinely excited about experimenting with fashion. For dunhill, it was a new way to approach the archive without being a slave to it. To look at classic campaign imagery, such as the Jermyn Street storefront from the ‘60s, or lighter advertising in the ‘70s, and bring it to the point of today through Kenta’s craft felt distinctly new.” – Mark Weston